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High-Fiber Diet Linked To Lower Risk Of Death And Chronic Diseases

13 January 2019

For every 15 grams of whole grain (high fiber, NDLR) dietary supplement consumed per day, the total number of deaths and the incidence of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and colorectal cancer, for example, decreased by 19%.

This resulted in 13 fewer deaths and six fewer cases of coronary heart disease in every 1000 people.

NEW YORK, Jan 12 ― New research commissioned by the World Health Organization has found that including plenty of fibre and whole grains in the diet can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer.

Most people worldwide consume less than 20g of dietary fibre per day. Rich sources of dietary fibre include whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruit.

The WHO defines an unhealthy diet as one of the major risk factors for a range of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes and other conditions linked to obesity.

"(And) the breakdown of fibre in the large bowel by the resident bacteria has additional wide-ranging effects including protection from colorectal cancer". Based on the research, he recommends 25 grams (0.88 ounces) to 29 grams (1.02 ounces) of fiber each day.

This is published unedited from the PTI feed.

Fibre rich fruits include bananas, oranges, apples, mangoes, strawberries, raspberries, while beans, legumes or darker coloured vegetables too have high-fibre content. People who all are gym freak may note that the foods with low glycaemic index will get sugars, fats or sodium.

"The work that we have done particularly on fibre and the gut micro flora (microbiome), in Cambridge and in recent years in Dundee, means we have enough evidence from population studies, human experimental work and the biochemistry and physiological of fibre to be confident of the clear benefits to health".

Prof Mann said: "The health benefits of fibre are supported by over 100 years of research into its chemistry, physical properties, physiology and effects on metabolism".

They also noted that their study looked mainly at foods rich in naturally occurring fibre, rather than synthetic fibre, such as powders, that can be added to foods. "The analyses presented by Reynolds and colleagues provides compelling evidence that dietary fibre and whole grain are major determinants of numerous health outcomes and should form part of public health policy". It was conducted by researchers from the University of Otago, the Riddet Centre of Research Excellence, and the University of Dundee.

High-Fiber Diet Linked To Lower Risk Of Death And Chronic Diseases