Monday, 15 July 2019
Latest news
Main » Android Clickfraud Apps Randomly Disguise as Other Apps To Fake Genuine Traffic

Android Clickfraud Apps Randomly Disguise as Other Apps To Fake Genuine Traffic

10 December 2018

Google announced that it had chose to abandon further support all electronic devices running on Android operating system 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. That batch, according to a new Ars Technica report, includes 22 titles like the flashlight app Sparkle Flashlight, which was downloaded more than 1 million times over the previous year or so.

The apps were used to "click endlessly on fraudulent ads", the Ars report states.

But it does mean that Google has washed its hands of pimped-up choc ice of an operating system, meaning it'll be down to developers to decide if a fork is justified, and identifying it, and any legacy builds in the Play Store. The modules caused the phones to click on huge numbers of links that hosted fraudulent apps.

Thought Google has it's Google Play protect to check its apps on play store whether they contain harmful viruses or not, but there are hackers do get through. To prevent users from suspecting their phones were infected, the apps displayed the ads in a window that was zero pixels high and zero wide.

That problem with this latest batch of bad apps was that researchers found a "device-draining backdoor" in the apps that allowed them to quietly download files from a server controlled by an attacker.

This means that further updates for apps running on older version of Android will disappear gradually. Google announced today it will no longer support Google Play Services on the OS, meaning apps may stop working and updates won't be as frequent as they once were.

If you still own a device that runs on Android ICS OS, then you might be in the 1% of the global users, according to Google. What's more, according to Sophos, the impressions were made to appear as though they were coming from iPhone users. HDFC Mobile Banking App Removed From Google Play & Apple App Store; Here's Why. Worth pointing out is that Ars concludes its piece with this counter to that point: Even if you concede the company is not doing a good enough job here, Google is nevertheless moving quickly to pull these apps once they're reported.

Very few devices are running the older Android versions.

Android Clickfraud Apps Randomly Disguise as Other Apps To Fake Genuine Traffic