Monday, 19 November 2018
Latest news
Main » Boeing issues safety bulletin after Lion Air crash

Boeing issues safety bulletin after Lion Air crash

09 November 2018

A Lion Air 737 Max 8 carrying 189 people dove into the Java Sea at high speed on Oct 29 minutes after takeoff.

In its safety warning to airlines on Wednesday, Boeing directed them to existing flight crew procedures to address issues with erroneous input from an AOA sensor. Erroneous readings can in some circumstances cause the 737 MAX to point the nose down sharply to keep air under the wings and avoid a stall, according to a person briefed on the matter.

Representatives of 737 MAX operators, Singapore Airlines Ltd SIAL.SI offshoot SilkAir, Garuda Indonesia GIAA.JK and Canada's WestJet Ltd WJA.TO , said they had not yet received a bulletin from Boeing. The AD now affects 246 total Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in service globally.

Boeing's safety bulletin also instructs flight crews on the potential malfunction, and the ways in which pilots should respond should the error occur.

"Our pilot was simply following the guidance and instructions provided by the AMC officer", he told The Australian " All movement from the parking stand to the runway is the responsibility of the AMC.

A brand new Boeing 737 Max 8 jet operated by the Indonesian budget carrier plunged into the Java Sea minutes after takeoff from the nation's capital on October 29, killing 189 people.

Moments earlier, the pilots radioed a request to return to Jakarta to land, but never turned back toward the airport, according to Indonesia's safety commission and flight-tracking data.

"The draft of what will be conveyed by Boeing this morning has been presented to us", said air accident investigator Nurcahyo Utomo.

Boeing said the action was taken after the Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee indicated that the Lion Air jet experienced erroneous input from one of those sensors.

Based on the preliminary data recovered from the wreckage of PK-LQP (msn 43000), the DJPU said that the aircraft's airspeed indicator malfunctioned during four flights prior to the doomed flight JT610 from Jakarta Soekarno-Hatta to Pangkalpinang.

Officials have now said that the incident will be thoroughly investigated.

This affects almost 250 aircraft flown by U.S. airlines like Southwest, American and United, the FAA said.

The airline said at the time that it had 61 "firm orders" for the planes.

The Indonesian Ministry of Transportation has begun an audit of Lion Air (JT, Jakarta Soekarno-Hatta) and has also started impromptu checks of various other Indonesian carriers following the crash of one of the low-priced carrier's B737-8s on October 29.

Indonesia's search and rescue agency extended the search effort on Wednesday for a second time, saying it would continue until Sunday.

Boeing issues safety bulletin after Lion Air crash