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Another tropical system in the Atlantic, poses no US threat

19 August 2018

There's a new storm over the ocean that is expected to strengthen into a major hurricane as it it moves towards the Central Pacific. Additional strengthening is possible this week. A faster northeastward motion is forecast to occur on Thursday and Friday.

Ernesto is no threat to land.

An initial intensity for this system is set to a "possibly conservative" 35 miles per hour, which is slightly below the latest satellite intensity estimate.

The term "subtropical" means the system now lacks the symmetrical characteristics of most tropical storms. Typically, the wind field on a sub tropical storm is wider than a tropical storm.

Tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from the storm's center.

Further intensification is likely over the next few days as Lane encounters a conducive large-scale environment consisting of low shear and fairly warm waters.

Hurricane season peaks in September and does not end until November 30th.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration revised its hurricane season forecast earlier this month, advising people that the Atlantic hurricane season will be less active than usual. Airborne Saharan dust, which has been recorded as far away as Texas this season, is also keeping the atmosphere dry and unfavorable for tropical weather to form.

So why is it considered subtropical and why are these types of storms given names?

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Another tropical system in the Atlantic, poses no US threat