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Confusion over chilling discovery in NSW school sandpit

02 January 2018

Miller also said when he had "shone a light through the egg" and seen a "small striped baby snake".

Snakes cannot dig and don't bury their eggs, and it has been suggested the eggs could have been laid by a far less unsafe local species: the water dragon.

Volunteers believed they were laid by two snakes most likely from a reserve that backs onto the school with FAWNA volunteer Yvette Attlier saying the location was an ideal spot for laying eggs.

"We believed at the time, and still do. that we may have had snake eggs", it said in a Facebook post.

"Snakes don't bury their eggs". FAWNA NSW, Inc. now says the eggs may belong to a far less deadly reptile species called water dragons, and acknowledged that ultimately they are unsure what species the eggs belong to.

"We were told was there were a couple of sightings of large brown snakes behind the area and all we could surmise is that they were brown snake eggs".

Bryan Fry, who specialises in venomous animals and is an associate professor in the University of Queensland's school of biological sciences, confirmed at least part of the story.

The eggs were apparently pretty ripe, and were set to hatch within about two weeks of their discovery.

"The sand was still fresh and loose and would have provided the flawless place for snakes to regulate the eggs due to the temperature", Yvette Attlier, a volunteer with the group Fawna, told the Camden Haven Courier.

'The sand was still fresh and loose and would have provided the ideal place for snakes to regulate the eggs due to the temperature, ' Ms Attleir said. "It's part of the beauty of living in this area".

"We've been abused after rescuing snakes in the past", Attleir said.

According to the Australia Venom Research Unit of the University of Melbourne, the country is home to 20 of the world's 25 most venomous snakes, including the entire top 10, from which a single scratch from a venom-coated tooth can be enough to paralyze the heart, diaphragm and lungs.

"It was a huge sandpit, so it took three mornings of digging to remove all the eggs", she said.

Catholic schools in New South Wales reopen after the summer holidays on 30 January.

Confusion over chilling discovery in NSW school sandpit