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Buffalo Bills lose touchdown after yet another controversial catch ruling

25 December 2017

The Bills ended up tying the game with a field goal entering halftime.

Bills wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin appeared to complete a handsome, 4-yard touchdown catch just before halftime of Buffalo's 37-16 loss in New England on Sunday. Jordan Poyer started the fireworks by making a diving interception of a Tom Brady pass and returning it 19 yards for a touchdown. But, during the mandatory review of the score, officials determined that Benjamin did not gain complete control at the time his feet were inbounds. A former National Football League executive in charge of officiating, Mike Pereira, said on Twitter, "Don't see how the Buffalo TD was overturned". It looked enough like Benjamin's toe dragged in the end zone while he had full control of the ball that it seemed like a hard call to overturn, but plenty of people thought Jesse James scored last weekend as well.

Former NFL officiating boss Mike Pereira was among the critics of the overturned call.

Another week, another Another week, another touchdown against the Patriots reversed by the refs.

NFL vice president of officiating Al Riveron ruled that when Benjamin gained control of the football, his left foot was not touching the ground. From the video, there is no clear evidence the call on the field should have been changed.

The NFL is going to have to tweak replay again during the offseason. So, his back foot was already off the ground and it stepped out of bounds. A turning point in last week's New England win came when the Steelers' Jesse James was ruled to have lost control of the ball as he hit the ground following a catch, negating a last-minute touchdown that nearly certainly would have given Pittsburgh a crucial victory. However, he made sure to let it be known he thinks that decision was terrible.

Buffalo Bills lose touchdown after yet another controversial catch ruling