Wednesday, 23 May 2018
Latest news
Main » Coral-Breeding Programme Offers Hope For Australia's Great Barrier Reef

Coral-Breeding Programme Offers Hope For Australia's Great Barrier Reef

28 November 2017

The research carried out by these scientists is not only beneficial to the Great Barrier Reef but is applicable globally.

UQ School of Biological Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies Professor Peter Mumby said these reefs appeared to be less at risk of the damaging effects of bleaching and starfish predation.

"These findings by no means suggest that the Great Barrier Reef corals are safe and in great condition, and there are no reasons for concern", said Dr Hock.

"The success of this new research not only applies to the Great Barrier Reef but has potential global significance".

Study authors traveled to the Great Barrier Reef to test their technique.

"This is a time for us to do more and act now to save the Great Barrier Reef", according to ABC.

Last week a separate team announced they had successfully bred "baby" coral on the Great Barrier Reef, producing more than a million larvae after collecting coral sperm and eggs produced during last November's spawning period.

"When I heard about the wonderful success Peter was having with his work, I knew I had to help get it happening on the Great Barrier Reef so we could prove the concept would work on the world's largest and greatest coral reef, our $56 billion natural wonder", he said.

Coral-Breeding Programme Offers Hope For Australia's Great Barrier Reef
Coral-Breeding Programme Offers Hope For Australia's Great Barrier Reef

Dr. Wachenfeld said, "In the past, the Marine Park Authority has had a philosophy of basically getting out of nature's way".

"It's also important to keep in mind that restoration options like this don't lessen the need for strong action to reduce the major drivers of reef decline being climate change, water quality and pest management".

"A partnership between the private sector, the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the State Government through to both the environment department and national parks, as well as traditional owners are giving a real opportunity to avoid extinction to more than one turtle species", Mr Mile said.

The team found a technique known as larval reseeding for accelerating the coral growth through it. Peter Harrison, a leading researcher from the Southern Cross University, Peter Harrison said in a statement that.

Scientists will continue to monitor the new colonies to make sure the technique worked. When the same team conducted a similar experiment in the Philippines, it took three years for larvae to grow to the size of dinner plates.

Professor Harrison said another AUD 1-2 million a year would be required to expand the project over the course of next 5-10 years.

Unlike many other parts of the reef, these 100 are not being eaten up by crown-of-thorns starfish predators.

Lady Elliot Island is located at the southern tip of the Great Barrier Reef, about 130km from Hervey Bay.

Coral-Breeding Programme Offers Hope For Australia's Great Barrier Reef